Restoration | Sumerian Culture Found Throughout the World [Part 1 – South America]

Restoration | Sumerian Culture Found Throughout the World [Part 1 – South America]

Throughout the world, from the Americas to East Asia, we find traces of the Sumerian culture; a culture which was supposedly limited to Mesopotamia.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America
The monument as seen from the front

Some of the more incredible examples of Sumerian culture being found in places where it should not be, according to mainstream researchers, is in South America.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America
Zoomed in highlights of the script found on the monument

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The Pokotia Monument, discovered in Bolivia in 2002, has continued to ignite controversy in the archaeological community since its discovery due to the presence of proto-Sumerian writing on multiple parts of the roughly four-foot tall figure. Experts in Sumerian language who’ve examined the figure have concluded that it is indeed a form of proto-Sumerian writing, and that it also has the addition of other Sumerian glyphs. How or why it was discovered buried in Bolivia remains baffling for said experts who’ve examined it. Though the combination of the two forms of writing on the figure points its origin directly to the ancient Sumerian culture.

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Very curious is the fact that proto-Sumerian non-ligature writing was found on the figure. Proto-Sumerian writing, such as was found, is thought to be from a culture predating the Sumerian culture; already considered to be one of the oldest known cultures in the world. Proto-Sumerian is thought to have trickled in to the earliest stages of Sumerian culture before being shifted into the more well-known cuneiform. So the monument would appear to have come from the earliest years of the Sumerian culture or possibly from a yet unidentified culture that existed before them.

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Adding to the evidence of early Sumerian interaction in Bolivia is the Magna Fuente bowl.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America

MineTheHive, Sumerian, AmericaLong considered to be possibly the most enigmatic artifact discovered in the Americas, and once existing as a bowl to feed pigs before being handed to a museum in the 1960’a, the Magna Fuente bowl is decorated with proto-Sumerian cuneiform script and figures reminiscent of those found in the ruins of ancient Sumeria. Like the Pokotia Monument, experts who’ve analyzed the Magna Fuente bowl have found themselves stumped; as the bowl appears genuine, and the script shows all signs of being authentic, yet how it came to be buried in Bolivia remains as a frustrating mystery for these researchers.

Interesting to note is that both the above artifacts showcase proto-Sumerian, though they do so in a way that makes them distinctive; similar to how later Mesopotamian cultures who used cuneiform writing had their own unique styles. This adds to the idea that one of the earliest versions of the Sumerian culture, or perhaps even a more ancient root culture, were the ones who came and developed a presence in the Americas.

Other curious items found in South America include a piece of animal skin decorate in Sumerian writing that was previously displayed in the Peruvian museum in La Paz, Bolivia. Originally published in Reisen durch Sudamerika by two German researchers, it shares many of the same symbols found in the Fuente Magna bowl.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America
Animal skin with Sumerian script

The collection of Father Carlos Crespi also remains as a bizarre enigma of South American history.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America
Artifact given to Crespi

Crespi was a missionary who traveled to Ecuador in 1923 to help the indigenous people in the region. In short order, he became a beloved figure amongst the local people who described him as being incredibly warm and kind-hearted. His total commitment to his relief work and love of the local people eventually resulted in the natives bringing him gifts and tokens of their appreciation.

Among these gifts were odd artifacts covered in an unknown form of writing and depictions of beings that seemed to be far from the native peoples’ style of art. After so many of these had come to him, all of which he’d been arranging as a display out in the church’s courtyard, he began asking the natives where they were finding these objects. Their answer was that they, or their parents or grandparents or great-grandparents etc, had pulled them from a cave well-known to the local people as being an incredibly ancient site filled with such objects.

After Father Crespi showed in interest in these artifacts, natives began routinely salvaging them from the cave to give to Crespi in appreciation for some act of kindness he’d recently done. In all, and after 60 years with the natives, thousands of these objects had been collected. The natives were always happy to give them to Father Crespi as they knew that it brought him great joy, though Father Crespi never did anything with the artifacts besides setting them out for everyone to see.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America

Of particular interest is the objects in his collection that show distinctly Sumerian aspects—and there are many to be found. A great deal more are said to have existed but a large portion of Father Crespi’s collection was destroyed by a fire in the early 60’s. One of the more interesting artifacts (seen below) is a tablet that shares a nearly identical inscription to what’s found on the Pokotia Monument.

MineTheHive, Sumerian, America

Sources:

Guaman Poma de Ayala, El primer nueva crónica y buen, (1615).

http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/ wikipedia.com

“Decipherment of the Cuneiform.” Decipherment of the Cuneiform Writing of the Fuente Magna Bowl, Bibliotecapleyades, www.bibliotecapleyades.net/arqueologia/esp_boliviarosseta_5.htm.

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