Restoration | Clashing Ruins of the Americas [Part 1]

The notion that civilization, and by extension, technology and culture, exist at a relatively higher point the closer said things are to the modern era is a very deep rooted belief, so much so that it’s essentially acquired the status of being common sense amongst many: we once lived in caves, and humanity has been rising and improving since.

And this is, of course, quite reasonable since technology and culture both apparently progress forward with age.

However, this is a short-sighted understanding.

Though our supposed history would seem to suggest that technology and culture have both been steadily progressing since their dawn, discoveries throughout the world tell a much different story. Many of the ruins we find would almost seem to suggest that the dawn of our recorded history is actually a low point, or in the path of one, for human civilization.

The above understanding riddles ancient stories and mythic traditions, but one doesn’t need to go so far as to put trust in such accounts to believe that civilization, and humanity’s technology in general, may rise and fall throughout the eons like a sine wave. Our planet is decorated with ruins that showcase this, and the Americas, in particular, happens to have some of the most blatant examples.


The Ruins of Sacsayhuaman in Peru

Ruins, sacsayhuaman, minethehive, ancient civilizations
Differing architecture at Sacsayhuaman

Sacsayhuaman, as seen above, is what remains of an ancient complex on an artificially flattened hill situated in modern Peru. Like a number of similar sites, credit for its construction has mostly been given to the Inca empire since they’re considered to be one of the last great pre-columbian empires in the region. Taking into account what was mentioned above, technology is said to progress, so the Inca are the assumed creators: as they must have been the most advanced, and therefor, the most likely creators for the still baffling marvels found at the site.

But when looking at the photo above, one aspect of the construction should seem clear: two very disparate groups of people appear to have worked on this site. Additions of small and loosely stacked rocks can be seen contrasting against the remarkable stone work that would seem to have existed before said clumsier additions. This earlier stonework remains mind-blowing today as these immense, multi-ton stones were crafted to fit so flawlessly together that no mortar was needed; it’s said that you can’t slide a piece of paper between them.

Along with the idea that the Inca must have been responsible for the construction due to their empire’s more recent age, shards of pottery found at the site dating from the Inca period have been used as a secondary confirmation. Yet, the Inca were known to have occupied and expanded on the site, and they were a culture with a rich pottery tradition, so naturally such things would be found and should only speak to their presence in the region, not their construction of the great works found in the same region; just as much later barbarian cultures who used the Roman empire’s roads aren’t attributed to them, despite leaving lasting stains of their culture upon them.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations
credit pierre pouliquin

More importantly, the Inca don’t claim to have constructed the site. They believe that in the ancient past, a race of gods or a race of people led by gods arrived to create the incredible site—a belief that’s also given to many other megalithic sites throughout the Americas by local natives. And just looking at pictures of the site, it would seem obvious that the clearly later additions, of substantially poorer quality, were the work of the Incas arriving at a site that was already quite ancient; they are the last culture said to have worked on the site, and the poor additions that can be seen are clearly the latest.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations

.

The Killke culture, coming just before the Inca, are also said to have had some form of hand in this site’s creation based on their iconic pottery fragments being found nearby. But, like the Inca, the Killke culture didn’t produce anything else of even remotely similar quality to the stonework found at Sacsayhuaman. Any structures that are undeniably known to be the work of either the Inca or Killke look worlds apart from what’s found at this site; they’re poorly built with small rocks from the local area, none are gorgeous constructions made from gigantic megaliths that were cut 9 or 22 miles away and carried through the mountains to create bizarre stone structures that look to have been melted together.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations
An example of well-accepted Inca stonework (Note the use of mortar)

Suspicion would say that once a far more deep and thorough excavation is carried out at Sacsayhuaman, the very ancient past will begin to be revealed, along with evidence of the long lost culture that the Inca themselves insist to be the true founders of Sacsayhuaman.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations

.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations
Strange Inverted formations

.

sacsayhuaman, ruins, minethehive, ancient civilizations
Bizarre stone slides found at Sacsayhuaman

.

.

.

.

.


The Ruins of Puma Punku in Bolivia

Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

Walking through what remains of Puma Punku has been likened to falling into an outlandish fantasy novel—tumbling down a rabbit hole is equally fitting—as what you’ll see at this site doesn’t seem to have any business existing in today’s world. It’s been described as the most bizarre place on Earth as well as the gods’ quarry because some of the most remarkable and confusing stonework can be found littering the high-elevation area where Puma Punku is found like the remains of a divine Lego castle smashed apart in pre-history.

Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, PrimevalAs with Sacsayhuaman, what can be found at Puma Punku has been attributed to a number of the latest pre-columbian civilizations known to have inhabited the area, including the Tiwanaku and later Inca empire. And just like Sacsayhuaman, survivors and remnants of the Inca empire scoff at the idea that they created such things. For a time, its creation was even given to a culture that is said to not have made use of the wheel.

The simple fact that this site exhibits stonework that appears to be more precise and overall substantially more sophisticated than almost any other ancient stonework found on Earth speaks to the fact that this was not the work of a simple culture known to build sloppy and imprecise small structures with small stones and mortar—I can only liken this to finding skyscrapers near mud huts and lumping them both with the same civilization because you found a clay water jug amongst the ruins of a skyscraper.

Absolutely precise angles and perfectly distanced drill holes cover the ruins of Puma Punku. You’ll find a series of deep and flawless bore holes, thinner than a pencil and all identical and all equally spaced, lining an indentation in an staggering andesite block cut in a precise and bizarrely angled form.

Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

With that said, its very worth noting that great contention exists over the how and why of this site. Many of the stones are immaculately carved “H blocks” that hardly seem to make sense in any envisioned building scheme. The flawless miniature drill holes, as well, baffle experts attempting to understand why such immense effort appears to have been put in to thousands of incredibly difficult features that have no clear purpose and negligible aesthetic value—other than the outrageous level of master effort that would have been needed to create each one of them: in that sense, bragging rights, so to speak. The distance the blocks were carried from, up to 60 miles, is also a dizzying aspect of the site, especially when you consider that it exists at over 12,000 feet: placing it above the tree line. There were certainly other stones around—the Inca, for instance, created their sites with tiny local stones—but the creators of Puma Punku insisted on carrying stones—some over 286,000 lbs—up and through the mountains to this high-altitude site.

Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

The site was unfortunately heavily used as a place to salvage stone [this is elaborated upon further below]. Accounts from 400 years ago detail how efforts to dismantle and repurpose the site had been, and were still, in full effect at that time; a particular account comments that if the site had been more accessible, there’d have been nothing left. As well, and as can be seen in the video below, far earlier destructions and salvaging can be seen in some of the more recently exposed remains where gorgeous andesite blocks sit nexts to much more frail and poorly created sandstone blocks. Seeing this, it becomes apparent that the higher quality stone brought and placed by the original creators was repurposed by a later culture; it doesn’t take a master craftsman or mason to notice the clear disparity between the craftsmanship.

Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

An issue with sites such as this is the prevalence of information regarding them being sourced back to the popular History Channel show Ancient Aliens. Troubling, since the show has a woeful habit of misrepresenting, disregarding, or exaggerating information about sites such as Puma Punku; a thoroughly unnecessary practice as said sites are already a tremendous anomaly through the mainstream lens alone.

Stretching or filtering the truth, even if it may amount to the most accurate vision, too often serves to only discredit the undeniably remarkable aspects of such sites. So-called “debunkers” prey on leaps of faith and clumsy or supposed facts to discredit the entirety of an ancient site’s outstanding nature: See, this point isn’t exactly right, and this is technically just hearsay, and this doesn’t have strong enough evidence, etc. And such rebuttals stand as welcomed trump cards amongst the heavily-set-in-their-ways masses which are all-too happy to bury the troublesome notions of inquisitive minds who try to move against what the majority of peoples’ subconscious minds have been sculpted to embrace as the cleanest survival mechanism with nice odds: going with the flow/not rocking the boat.
Restoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, PrimevalRestoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, PrimevalRestoration, MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval


The Ruins of Tiwanaku

MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

Our mention of Tiwanaku—the ancient city—here will be rather brief, as it isn’t far from the site of Puma Punku mentioned above yet remains a somewhat disparate creation.

MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, PrimevalI find that bringing this up after Puma Punku is rather significant as Tiwanaku showcases layers of creation from what appears to be at least two very different cultures, the older apparently far more advanced. Yet neither seem to touch on the bizarre complexity of the above mentioned site of Puma Punku; a site which is said to have been the work of the gods while Tiwanaku was built nearby and in reverence of said gods, possibly as a vassal extension for said gods. Still, with that said, Tiwanaku showcases some incredible construction aspects which speak to elements of it being the work of a civilization possibly contemporary with the now proven, but still unnamed, 12,000 + year old civilization that constructed the immense megalithic complex Gobekli Tepe—a site with 50 + immense stone henges featuring out-carved figures, all of which was intentionally buried under thousands of tons of dirt.

Evidence for the early creators of Tiwanaku existing at this time partly comes from the polish engineer Arthur Posnansky who spent 50 years studying the site in the middle of the 20th century. He brought several critical factors to light, mainly—in my opinion—that Tiwanaku appeared to have been an ancient port. A bizarre finding, as it’s over two miles above sea level and lake Titicaca is 12-15 miles away from the apparent port structure. Yet, the port structure clearly remains, surrounded by awkwardly angled water marks on nearby rock faces that seem to suggest that a great body of water once existed in this area that, itself, once was shifted to a different degree. Which is quite the understanding, as such massive upheaval hasn’t taken place since the Younger Dryas period—roughly 12-14,000 years ago, when there may have been water levels at the mysterious ports that can be found at Tiwanaku.

MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

This also happens to be close to the date that Arthur Posnansky gave to the city based upon his studies of the megaliths and astrological alignments. Like nearly all ancient megalithic sites, the megaliths of Tiwanaku appeared to have been aligned with the stars above. Posnansky, when examining this, found that the sky had to be rolled back to roughly 13,000 BC for their alignment to perfectly fit.

If the initial city was created at this time, it would help explain its bizarre placement and structures as well as odd artifacts such as the Fuente Magna bowl—which appears to show Sumerian writing—as well as depictions of elephants and other long extinct creatures on the north American continent; the prior touching on a lost, world-traveling civilization, the later helping explain that civilization may be far older than we believe.

MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval


Worth mentioning is that the sites listed above, as with many of the oldest and most bizarre megalithic sites found throughout the world, have been subjected to intensive periods of looting, use as quarries, and outright intentional destruction—typically by militarized religious groups, such as the Holy Roman Empire, who destroyed such sites with the public explanation that they could have only been the work of the devil. As such, a staggering amount of artifacts and writings have been taken from us because they were not deep enough and so within reach of these regrettable entities—for more on this, research the work of the Spanish priest Diego De Landa, the destruction of the Library of Alexandria, the information purge led by chancellor Li Si, and other great destructions of knowledge as well as the all-too common practice of destroying ruins for building material and the worldwide age-old problem with looting/tomb raiders.

.

MineTheHive, Ruins, Ancient Civilizations, Primeval

.

.

As a rapidly growing mass of evidence is now suggesting, our Earth was subjected to a fragmented comet bombardment around 10,900bc; an event which now appears to be directly linked to the temperature changes of the Younger Dryas, or little ice age, period [A recent article about the subject: ].

This moment would represent the fall of what’s recorded in numerous mythic traditions as humanity’s golden age.

.

.

.

.

[This is part 1 of our series on contrasting ruins of the Americas—keep an eye out for the follow ups]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *